A screencast of this blog post is here.

Because Smalltalk was the origin of much of today’s GUI (mouse, overlapping windows, drop-down menus), Smalltalk developers are understandably accustomed to a nice GUI IDE. GemStone/S is an excellent database and Smalltalk execution environment and includes a built-in command-line tool, Topaz, where you can execute Smalltalk code, but has no native GUI. In this blog post we continue a demonstration of GemStone.app on the Macintosh (started here) and show Jade, a GUI-based IDE available on Microsoft Windows.

We launch GemStone.app on the Macintosh, update the version list, download 3.1.0.4, then install and start a GLASS extent (image) that includes Monticello/Metacello tools. When the database is running we start a Topaz session and install Seaside 3.0 and Magritte 3 with the following script:

run
"based on https://code.google.com/p/glassdb/wiki/Seaside30Configuration"
MCPlatformSupport commitOnAlmostOutOfMemoryDuring: [
  ConfigurationOfMetacello project updateProject.
  ConfigurationOfMetacello loadLatestVersion.
  Gofer project load: 'Seaside30' group: 'Seaside-Adaptors-Swazoo'.
].
%
errorCount
! 
commit
run
"based on http://www.iam.unibe.ch/pipermail/smallwiki/2012-February/007188.html"
Gofer it
  squeaksource: 'MetacelloRepository';
  package: 'ConfigurationOfMagritte3';
  load.
%
errorCount
!
commit
run
MCPlatformSupport commitOnAlmostOutOfMemoryDuring: [
  ConfigurationOfMagritte3 project stableVersion load.
].
%
errorCount
!
commit
run
WAGsSwazooAdaptor new start.
%

When Swazoo is running, we can go to http://localhost:8080 and see Seaside running locally. This demonstrates running Smalltalk code in Topaz, the command-line tool. Next we look at a GUI-based IDE that runs on a Microsoft Windows client platform.

Jade is available as a 14 MB zip download from http://seaside.gemtalksystems.com/jade/. It includes an executable, client libraries (DLLs) for various GemStone/S versions (ranging from 32-bit version 6.1 to the latest 64-bit version), and related files (including source code). Like most GemStone/S client GUI tools, it is built in another Smalltalk (in this case, Dolphin Smalltalk from Object Arts), but unlike these other tools, you can’t see the client Smalltalk (unless your load Jade source code into your own Dolphin development environment), so we avoid the the two-object-space confusion. Jade is intended to take you directly to GemStone/S, without going through Pharo, Squeak, VA, or VW Smalltalk.

Jade is also designed to work with the no-cost version of GemStone/S (unlike the VA/VW-based GBS tools), and performs well on a slow network (unlike GemTools).

When you unzip the download, you have a folder with various items. Jade.exe is the primary executable (containing the Dolphin VM and the image) and it relies on Microsoft’s C Runtime Library. There is a copy of the executable in Jade.jpg for sites where executables are stripped from zip files during the download process (simply rename the suffix and it will become executable). Contacts.exe is used sometimes in a training class. The bin directory contains the GCI client libraries and a DLL with various images used in the IDE. You can also see a directory containing source code for Jade.

Screen Shot 2013-10-01 at 10.56.18 AM

When you launch Jade, you get a login window that gives you a place to select the GemStone/S version (which GCI library we will use), and other information needed for a login. The Stone box contains two fields, one for the host/IP of the Stone machine (from the perspective of the Gem machine, so localhost is almost always sufficient), and the name of the Stone. In the screencast mentioned above our stone was named gs64stone1. The Gem box contains a number of fields. Most logins will use an RPC Gem (a Linked Gem is available only on 32-bit Windows) with a Guest-authenticated Gem (if your NetLDI was not started in guest mode (-g), then you will need to provide an OS user and password). An RPC Gem will be started by a NetLDI, so we need to identify the Gem machine (in my example the host is vienna and the NetLDI is listening on port 54120) and the command used to start the Gem (except in rare cases the command will be ‘gemnetobject’). You provide a GemStone User ID and Password (by default, ‘DataCurator’ and ‘swordfish’), and if you are going to use any Monticello features it would be good to identify the developer’s name (one word with CamelCase).

Screen Shot 2013-10-01 at 11.01.49 AM

If you get an error on login, we attempt to give as much explanation as possible. Typically, (1) there is no NetLDI on the host/port (see following example), (2) there is no stone with that name, (3) there is a version mismatch, or (4) you have given an unrecognized user ID or password.

Screen Shot 2013-10-01 at 11.13.38 AM

When you have a successful login, you will get a launcher that consists of several tabs. The Transcript serves the traditional (ANSI) Transcript function of showing output sent to the Transcript stream. The second tab shows information about your current session.

Screen Shot 2013-10-01 at 11.19.59 AM

The third tab shows information about the current logged-in sessions, including where the Gem is located, where the client GCI is located, and whether a Gem is holding the oldest commit record. If you have appropriate security, you can send a SigAbort to a session or even terminate it!

Screen Shot 2013-10-01 at 11.21.07 AM

The final tab is a Workspace. In this tab you can execute, print, and inspect Smalltalk code. You can also use the toolbar or menus to abort or commit and open other tools.

Screen Shot 2013-10-01 at 11.17.23 AM

 

One of the tools is a User Profile Browser that shows the various users defined in the database.

 

Screen Shot 2013-10-01 at 11.31.42 AM

Next is a Monticello Repository Browser that shows various repositories, packages, and versions.

 

Screen Shot 2013-10-01 at 11.32.47 AM

The Monticello Browser includes a tool to browse differences between packages.

Screen Shot 2013-10-01 at 11.33.36 AM

 

Much of your work will be done in a System Browser. This view shows the four SymbolDictionary instances in my SymbolList. UserGlobals is bold, indicating that it is the ‘home’ or default SymbolDictionary, but I have selected Globals and see a list of class categories, a partial list of classes, and in the lower section of the screen is a list of the non-class objects in Globals (note things like AllGroups and AllUsers).

Screen Shot 2013-10-01 at 11.41.42 AM

 

This screen shot shows us an example of the Packages view (which requires Monticello), and a method with a breakpoint (the red rectangle around a method).

Screen Shot 2013-10-01 at 11.43.54 AM

There are other tools, including a debugger, but I’ll leave that for your exploration (and/or another post/screencast).

Have fun and let me know if you have questions or feature requests.

 

 

 

 

 

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